• This week the Interpreter has hosted extensive analysis of the 13th Annual Shangri-La Dialogue. If you need an extra hit, however, Andrew Erickson has a nice round-up of the key statements and quotable quotes.
  • While Shangri-La has stolen the security limelight this week, Dmitry Gorenburg has been off covering the Moscow Conference on International Security, offering an alternative snapshot of how Russian, Belorussian, and Chinese security elites frame their strategic environment.
  • Obama has copped a lot of flak over his recent West Point commencement address. Has any of this offered any real insight into the 'Obama Doctrine'?
  • Mikhail Grinberg has a great piece exploring the defence industrial basis of national power, part of a CIMSEC-The Bridge series that is well worth reading over.
  • Another week, another book review. This time Mark Stout takes on Calder Walton's Empire of Secrets, which chronicles Britain's global contribution to Western Cold War intelligence efforts against the backdrop of decolonisation. 
  • The Atlantic community's inability to dissuade France from fulfilling its contract to build amphibious warfare ships for Russia underscores the challenges to collective action posed by the fragmentation of European defence procurement. 
  • On the IISS blog, Nick Bisley and Andrew Philips discuss the possible effect of Narendra Modi's electoral victory on India's strategic role. 
  • Is al Qaeda still a global terrorist threat, or does it represent a more localised challenge to security and political authority? JM Berger and Daveed Gartenstein-Ross have at it.
  • Finally, we generally focus on military technology as a wellspring of future weapons. Yet as Kelsey Atherton reveals, Dassault is currently engaging in quite the opposite endeavour: to recreate the lost technologies that secured Allied success on D-Day.