• Singapore goes to the polls on 11 September. Analysts are throwing their hats into the prediction ring, with many seeing the ruling PAP taking a hit but maintaining power (Michael Barr's piece here and James Chin's piece here). Others believe change is on its way.
  • Prashanth Parameswaran asked whether Thailand’s Chinese submarine purchase really signals a U.S. drift? There's an excellent reader on the subject (here) by Gregory Raymond. (Thanks, John)
  • A fascinating look at the working lives of five Yangon locals.
  • War is Boring took a good look at the conflict in Thailand’s deep south.
  • A boat carrying over 70 migrants sank off Malaysia, likely the beginning of many more (warned the UN) as the monsoon season comes to an end. 
  • The Bangkok bomb investigation is now focusing on Uighur sympathisers as the main suspects, with several arrests already made. Yet despite arrests, a DNA test shows that the main suspect remains at large.
  • Cambodia is further falling prey to China’s economic influence, says The Washington Post.
  • Vietnam is at a 'momentous juncture' as it 'creaks under the weight of an almost feudalistic political system' argues Jonathan London.
  • The Thai government has militarised the management of natural resources, argues Puangthong Pawakapan in a new ISEAS Perspective.
  • Unsurprisingly, and as suggested on these pages, a Thai Junta-appointed committee failed to pass the Junta’s draft constitution. As a result, elections will be further postponed (explained here). A good companion to the issue is this excellent piece: Making Sense of Thai Juntaland.