Once a month The Interpreter publishes Digital Diplomacy links. As Australian digital diplomacy strives to catch-up to the rest of the world, these links highlight the most creative and effective ways in which countries are leveraging the internet for foreign policy gain.

  • A brief history of online trolling between Western and Russian diplomats.
  • A blog post from the State Department on how the US is combating the online narrative of ISIS.
  • The US Government partnered with UNHCR and crowdfunding platform Kickstarter last month to assist Syrian refugees through citizen mobilisation.
  • The UK Foreign Office blogs about what it learnt from this year's distinctly digital UN General Assembly.
  • Last month Finland became the first country to launch its own emojis and India (via the government's 'Make in India' initiative) became the first non-US brand to get a Twitter emoji.
  • Did social media break the communication wall at the G20?
  • How can Canada's new government improve its digital diplomacy? Through distinguishing broadcasting from strategic engagement. And empowering and supporting the efforts of experimenters and pioneers. 
  • French Ambassador @GerardAraud knows how to throw an elbow and advocate for France online. Watch how he engages stakeholders and debates topics from European security to France's contribution to combating ISIS.
  • Coffee tips via Twitter from Australia's Ambassador to Indonesia.
  • Through working with hackers, Estonia's e-residency services and digital visa project forms part of how the country is thinking differently about its national brand. 
  • Scepticism about the value of LinkedIn as a tool of digital diplomacy.
  • The UK, Canada and the US teamed up to provide digital diplomacy training to Ukraine's Foreign Ministry. 
  • If you can get through the patchy recording, here's a great discussion from the Italian Embassy in Washington on getting beyond social media and using online mapping, data visualisations and e-learning: