By Chloe Hickey-Jones, an intern in the Lowy Institute's Melanesia Program.

  • Deborah Doane in The Guardian asks whether international NGOs still have the right to exist, and why issues of accountability and effectiveness will determine their future survival.
  • Jon Shepard also considers the performance of NGOs, examining their relevance and effectiveness. He ponders the truth behind the ideas of Duncan Green, and whether we have reached the end of the golden age of NGOs.
  • Duncan Green examines what relative inequality reveals about global poverty, arguing that measurements of absolute inequality could reveal more.
  • Radio National hosted a panel discussion on Australian aid and what makes overseas aid effective. Journalist Paul Barclay hosted Gina Olliveri from the Campaign for Australian Aid, Jo Hayter, CEO of the International Women's Development Agency, film producer Rebecca Barry, Fijian women's rights advocate Mei Mili and Her Excellency Annemieke Ruigrok, Ambassador of the Kingdom of the Netherlands to Australia. Listen to the podcast here.
  • The Next Einstein Forum was held in Africa last week. This forum brought together Africa's leading 700 scientists, mathematicians, entrepreneurs and other leaders from the fields of politics and development with policymakers and investors in the region. Read about the winning idea — a medical drone network — on the BBC.
  • Using data collected from the World Bank, Asif Islam explores whether the benefits of paternity leave extend to developing countries. Of the 53 countries, those who had mandated paternity leave had higher levels of female employment.
  • Chatham House launched their latest edition of International Affairs on International Women's Day, exploring gender equality, women, peace and security as a global agenda.
  • And in case you missed it, here is an edited transcript of former parliamentary secretary for international development assistance Bob McMullen's speech at the 2016 Australasian Aid Conference. You can listen to the podcast here.
  • The new What Went Wrong Foundation, started by Peter DiCampo who photographed failed or unfinished foreign aid projects in 2013, aims to facilitate conversations between donors and recipients globally (h/t Chris Blattman). Watch the video below: