• The Associated Press has an investigative report into how a flashy San Francisco based company contracted by the Sierra Leone Government and WHO to work on the Ebola response made a series of costly, and avoidable, mistakes. (h/t IPA).
  • Pete Vowles provides ten ideas about how to lead institutional change after spending three years trying to do just that at the UK's Department for International Development. DFAT take note.
  • Homi Kharas argues that the three major agreements of 2015 (Addis, SDGs, Paris) 'reflect a new theory of how to change the world that is not made explicit but has evolved as a matter of practice.'
  • Duncan Green discusses why everyone should have an RSS feed to keep on top of what's happening in her or his field, along with some of his favourite subscribes. I've had one for years and have never looked back.
  • Eight of the top 100 development economists by publication (according to the Research Papers in Economics database) are based in developing countries. David McKenzie provides a summary of each of their work.
  • Chris Blattman weighs in on the RCT debate that has been waged through development blogs over the past few months. Ruth Levine provides a primer on why the debate has become so heated.
  • Over on the Devpolicy blog, Jo Spratt argues that both Australia and New Zealand should be contributing more to the humanitarian effort in Syria, while Camilla Burkot interviews Lama Mouakea, who has been working on the frontlines of the current response.
  • To mark International Women's day a few week's ago The Guardian has a nifty, and detailed, interactive on all things contraception and family planning from around the world: