• The President's office is at the top of Mexico's digital diplomacy efforts.
  • America's Defence Intelligence Agency tweeted, deleted then apologised for a tweet critical of China stemming from the G20 staircase mishap. 
  • The Economist's data team looks at the Russian Government's media network Russia Today (RT) and finds its social media supporters are a peculiar bunch.
  • The UK's Department for Brexit joined Twitter (@DexEUgov) last month and attracted trolls from far and wide.
  • The Chinese Government's social media expansion, particularly on the Public Security side, is insane.
  • Syria Tracker records the ongoing story of the Syrian conflict through crowdsourced text, photo and video reports.
  • In response to an FOI request, the UK Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO) has published its tweet history since April 2008. 
  • Government bureaucracy and lack of a digital strategy is holding Taiwan back from connecting with the world.   
  • Why is it so hard to fight extremist propaganda online? Because governments are not the most capable in developing counter narratives for 21-year olds.
  • The British Council's new India initiative will target the country's 4G generation by connecting them to Shakespeare and British musicians on new digital platforms.
  • Why visual content is worth more than a 1000 words, even in foreign policy
  • Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau is already an online sensation. He is now on the cover of a marvel comic and is a king among memes.
  • Take a virtual tour of the FCO's London headquarters via their blog (each room has an accompanying podcast).
  • New Senator Pauline Hanson warned this week that Australia was in 'danger of being swamped by Muslims'. The hashtag #swamped was soon trending and Spain's Embassy in Canberra had the perfect riposte (h/t @JohnMGooding):