• A series of papers in the Lancet shows how maternal deaths worldwide have dropped by half since 1990. However, the current incidence  still exceeds the UN target. and there are also vast imbalances across the world: a woman in sub-Saharan Africa is more than 130 times more likely to die in child birth than one in a richer country.
  • Nancy Birdsall  unpacks what the middle class looks like in developing countries, and argues a vibrant middle is critical for good governance (non-paywall version available here).
  • Devpolicy has run the second in its series of Aid Profiles, this time on Indonesia's longest-serving women's organisation, Aisyiyah.
  • Anti-poverty charity Global Justice Now has ranked all 'economic entities' and found that 69 of the top 100 are corporations not countries. The Guardian discusses the rankings here.
  • Oxfam America president Ray Offenheiser argues in Time  for a new approach to foreign aid.
  • Lindy Kanan discusses the trials and tribulations of being a mother while trying to maintain a career in international development.
  • Incoming World Bank chief economist Paul Romer has released a paper highly critical of the field of macroeconomics, arguing that it has been going backwards for three decades. Daniel Drezner adds more fuel to the fire over at the Washington Post.
  • Development economist and popular blogger Chris Blattman has provided a post that conveniently summarises all of his very useful advice on how to 'do college right' from the Bachelor to PhD level.
  • The Centre for Global Development recently held a panel discussion to talk about the Asian Development Bank turning 50. Here is the video of the event (summary blog here):